How long does it take to get a High Court Writ?



So…


…you’ve realised that you need to transfer up your CCJ into a High Court Writ, but how long does that take?


After you have been awarded a judgement, the debtor is given a period of time within which they can make payment. This period of time is usually 14 days and only once this time has elapsed, are you able to start enforcement action.


As soon as #TeamCES receive your instruction, we will begin processing the transfer up of your CCJ via the completion and sending of the N293A form to the County Court for Part 2 to be sealed.


A Writ of Control is then applied for at the High Court.


This usually takes less than a week to happen, although it can take as many as 28 days in some cases.


It all depends on the speed and efficiency of the court issuing the Writ.


In all cases, we act as quickly as possible.


Upon the issue of the Writ, the debtor has seven days in which to pay. This is known as the Compliance Stage.


After those seven days have elapsed, a #TeamCES Enforcement Agent will visit the debtor’s premises (in line with all current coronavirus measures) in order to take control of the debtor’s goods.


Goods may be removed under the Sale & Disposal stage if payment is still not received.


Assuming the money is recovered, be that in full or as part of an agreed payment plan, #TeamCES are legally required to keep hold of the money for 14 days, before paying it to you, the claimant.


There are some variables then, which can slow down what is generally a quick process, but you can take steps to help speed things up further.


By completing the N293A form themselves, our clients are able to take it into the court and have part 2 sealed before it is sent to us.


As this part of the process is what usually takes the longest, doing so can significantly speed things up.


Instructing #TeamCES to trace a debtor before any kind of enforcement can also speed things up, as we are able to make sure we are sending notification to the correct address.


How long does it take to get a High Court Writ, then?


With #TeamCES, not long at all.



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