Travellers By Travellers Myth Busting



As part of our day to day work, we regularly come into contact with travellers or gypsies, usually when evicting them from illegal encampments.


To say they can sometimes present as a little p****d off would be an understatement, and whilst we will always carry out our evictions with a clients’ best interests at heart, we can certainly empathise with the groups that we move on.


Victims of racism, hate crime and general discrimination, these communities are often just looking for a place to rest.


Don’t get us wrong, there are a few rogue individuals who tarnish the reputation as a whole, but isn’t that the same as society in general?


We look to establish mutual respect and build relationships that serve everyone, including the evictees.


Part of that process is down to understanding the people we are dealing with…


So, here’s a brief education, straight from the horse’s mouth. Pardon the pun.


The Travellers Times explains that Romany Gypsies are the descendants of migrating people from Northern India. These groups eventually reached Great Britain in the 1600’s but the word ‘Roma’ usually refers to those that settled in mainland Europe.


Irish and Scottish Travellers are descendants of nomadic people in Ireland and Britain.


Essentially, ‘from here’, if you want to put it like that.


These groups are recognised as ethnic minorities by UK law, and a cross party parliamentary group exists on their behalf. They have a place in society.


With shared practices, dialects and languages, the different traveller communities within the UK are rich in culture. There are so many of them who are quite simply ‘good people’.


Whilst the percentage of the traveller community who are in prison is higher than the national percentage as a whole, the vast majority of caravans and caravan sites are on permanent public or private sites, with planning permission, waste management systems and residents who are subject to council tax.


This suggests that there are two sides to every coin, and that just because it might be easy to find a figure that supports an opinion, it is also likely that you’ll find one that disproves it as well.


It is certainly true that these communities face discrimination and persecution, perhaps due to misunderstandings.


Did you know that not all travellers actually ‘travel’ anywhere far at all?


Court Enforcement Specialists take the time to learn about the people we come into contact with.


It doesn’t prevent us from achieving successful evictions.


It actually supports us.



To find our more about us click below:


www.courtenforcementspecialists.co.uk


Contact us direct:


0161-507-0626


#TeamCES



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